Anais CBFic - Volume 1 - 2018

Sociedade Brasileira de Ficologia - SBFic

Publicado em 26/11/2018

Volume 1 - 2019

Título do Trabalho

FROM THE ANTARTIC POLE TO THE TROPICALS: EXPLORING SECONDARY METABOLITES FROM THE MACROALGAE HIMANTOTHALLUS GRANDIFOLIUS AND ASCOSEIRA MIRABILIS AS ALTERNATIVE TO TREAT THE NEGLECTED DISEASE LEISHMANIASIS

Autores

MARCIA A. S. GRAMINHA, LEANDRO DA COSTA CLEMENTINO, HOSANA DEBONSI, FERNANDO BOMBARDA ODA, ANDRé GONZAGA DOS SANTOS, MUTUE TOYOTA FUJII, LEONARDO VILLELA, PIO COLEPICOLO

Modalidade

Resumo

Área Temática

3 BIOTECNOLOGIA E INOVAçõES

Data de Publicação

26/11/2018

País da Publicação

Brasil

Idioma da Publicação

Português

Página do Trabalho

http://sbfic.org.br/anais_show/59

ISSN

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Palavras-Chave

antartic brown algae; antileishmanial activity

Resumo

Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Leishmania spp. Since the few available drugs have shown to be highly toxic and cases of resistance have emerged, new therapeutic agents are urgently needed. The plant kingdom is well known as an important source of natural products and widely used as a source of new pharmaceutical products and starting materials for the synthesis of many known drugs. In addition to the terrestrial flora, marine organisms, including algae, also feature a wide variety of new chemical entities, with great potential to be explored as the prospecting of new compounds. Algae are simple organisms that need to develop metabolic and physiological mechanisms to survive in a competitive environment as the marine one. Such characteristics provided a large arsenal of unique secondary metabolites arising from different metabolic pathways that are not found in terrestrial plants. Indeed, marine organisms have been described for different relevant biological effects, including anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, immunomodulatory, anti-allergic, anti-viral and anti-parasitic. Herein we report for the first time antileishmanial potential of the Antarctic brown algae Himantothallus grandifolius and Ascoseira mirabilis against Leishmania amazonensis. Samples of both brown algae were collected in Punta Plaza, King George Island, Antartic, in January 2012 and the voucher specimens were deposited in the herbarium SP of the Botanical Institute of São Paulo State, Brazil. Collected macroalgae were dried at room temperature, placed in plastic bag and kept at -80C until use. The fractionation and subfractionation were made using reagents with different polarities, followed by a bioguided approach in order to track the antilieshmanial constituents present in the algae. After CLAE-MS or GC-MS and NMR analyses, the chemical profile of H. grandifolius showed the presence of a proeminent peak in the chromatograms that correspond to the fatty acid 13E-docosenamide, which was latter showed to be responsible for the observed antileishmanial activity. Regarding A. mirabilis, a group of fatty acids, including hexadecanoic acid, commonly found in algae and previously shown to present antimicrobial activity, was identified during the chemical analyses and the attribution of the antileishmanial component is currently underway in our laboratory.